Peg’s Picks – July 26, 2017

me and mom

My mother (fan favorite Peggy Lee) recently retired and has a lot more time on her hands to listen to podcasts, so I’ve decided to curate a list of three specific episodes per week for her a listen to with a brief description to accompany them.  This is specifically made with her in mind, however, feel free to listen through I’m sure there will be interesting content for everyone, especially new listeners of podcasts.  Links are provided below for convenience however, you can also find these shows and episodes anywhere you consume podcasts.

This week we have three shows that I have not covered before on this blog.  The first is an NPR podcast entitled the “Ted Radio Hour”.  The host, Guy Raz, invites TED speakers to the show to dive deeper into the talks they gave.  Often times it allows for more context on a subject and answers questions that the talk may initially raise.  I found that I enjoy this podcast because it is essentially a relaxed speaker expanding on a big idea that in many cases I had never heard of.

The episode is called:

Prevention

This episode focuses on the idea of prevention in many of its forms.  Each speaker has a different lens to view the idea of preventing the perceived issue.  I don’t listen to this podcast as regularly as I used to, however, when this came on in my auto play list I found myself struggling to turn it off.

Hidden Brain is another NPR podcast that along the same lines of the Ted Radio Hour dives deeper into brilliant minds and big ideas.  The show will say it “reveals the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, the biases that shape our choices, and the triggers that direct the course of our relationships.”  However, I believe at its core this is a show about the science behind ideas we are curious about.  By ideas we’re curious about, I mean all of them, not only the science based ones.

The episode I’m recommending is called:

Summer Melt

This episode covers the phenomenon of “Summer Melt” which is when college students, (typically 1st generation college students) have completed all of their tasks to get into school however they don’t quite make it because of last minute issues.  This episode talks about what one school did to stop that.

Finally, I am recommending a podcast that has effectively become a mini series as it was canceled after only one season.  This is a Gimlet podcast entitled “Undone.”  Undone plays with the idea that stories in the news after they have been completed do not actually end.  This is to say that the story itself is only the tip of the iceberg and for the most part after it has been reported stories continue to move on beyond their perceived end.

This episode is called:

The Deacons

This episode covers the “Deacons for Defense and Justice”.  I love this episode because it dispels the idea that black folks have always attempted to fight for justice in a nonviolent way.  While this episode (nor I) advocate for violence when fighting for justice, this episode brings to light the idea of active resistance vs. passive resistance.  This was an eye opening episode that I would recommend to anyone.

Feel free to find me on Twitter or Instagram (@ohitsbigron) and let me know what you think of these recommendations, and check out the podcasts on the ohitsbigron studios network here, and here.

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Peg’s Picks – July 19, 2017

me and mom

My mother (fan favorite Peggy Lee) recently retired and has a lot more time on her hands to listen to podcasts, so I’ve decided to curate a list of three specific episodes per week for her a listen to with a brief description to accompany them.  This is specifically made with her in mind, however, feel free to listen through I’m sure there will be interesting content for everyone, especially new listeners of podcasts.  Links are provided below for convenience however, you can also find these shows and episodes anywhere you consume podcasts.

Last Week I recommended two shows from Radiolab and since I’m catching up on episodes I’ve missed I’m back this week with one more episode.  A recap for what exactly Radiolab is covered here in last week’s post

This episode is called:

Null and Void

Null and Void talks about something called jury nullification.  It covers a few unusual cases that shape how the US expectation of the court system works as well as specific about the role of the jury.  I can’t say much more without giving too much away, but this episode was very intriguing to think about.

My next recommendation is from “Code Switch” which is an NPR podcast that covers race and identity.  They have covered topics such as the Asian American community and their views on the Black Lives Matter movement as well as “the explanatory comma” or the necessity (or not) to explain your culture to those outside of it.

This episode is called:

What’s so wrong with African Americans Wearing African Clothes?

This episode hinges on a discussion had on another podcast called “The Stoop” in which one of the contributors claimed that African Americans wearing African clothes was a form of cultural appropriation.  This was not an easy discussion and I found myself yelling at my radio at times.  You will definitely have an opinion on this one and possibly a wider opinion on the subject of cultural appropriation based on this episode.

My final recommendation comes from a Gimlet Podcast entitled ‘Reply All’.  ‘Reply All’ is billed as “a show about the internet”.  However limiting that line sounds, you would be surprised (or not) about how many stories there are on and about the world wide web.

This episode is called:

Black Hole, New Jersey

Black Hole, New Jersey is about a mysterious address in New Jersey that may or may not be fencing stolen merchandise purchased from the internet.  This episode is interesting because it reveals a peek into shipping crime as I call it.  Or the ability for things ordered from the internet and then shipped to disappear.

Feel free to find me on Twitter or Instagram (@ohitsbigron) and let me know what you think of these recommendations, and check out the podcasts on the ohitsbigron studios network here, and here.

 

 

 

War for the Planet of the Apes

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Some may have forgotten already but this iteration of “Planet of the Apes” is the second major studio reboot for the franchise.  Forgotten of course referencing the 2001 reboot starring Mark Walberg and directed by Tim Burton.  The newest reboot of the franchise began in 2011 and has been popular among moviegoing audiences and critics alike.  Andy Serkis has shone in the motion capture lead role as the Caesar, a genetically altered ape who is leading a revolution of apes on an earth whose human population has been decimated by a virus.  Much of the success of these films have to do with making an effort to understand the apes themselves and how/why they are motivated to build their own society apart from humans.  This is done meticulously, first by showing how Caesar’s understanding of humans is complicated in “Rise of the Planet of the Apes”.  Then it is further deepened in “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” by displaying the importance of building a peaceful society apart from the humans.  Humans, who seem to be intent on survival at any cost, which could result in the death of many apes and/or the demise of their own fragile remaining society.  These films are built on ideas about the cost of survival versus functional society and how that plays out when those ideas are in opposition.  These films have been consistent in their storytelling which explains why they continue to do well.

A few words about War for the Planet of the Apes:

  1. Slow – The movie opens with a battle scene that is pretty intense viewing.  However, after the initial skirmishes, much of the first hour of the film plods along a little more deliberately than I would have hoped.  While the excellent acting of Andy Serkis shines through the CGI rendering of Caesar, the choice to make the movie more deliberate to me does so at the cost of what I believe the movie was selling. If indeed the movie intended to sell the final showdown for the fate of the earth’s superior inhabitants.  On some level the movie accomplished this showdown, however, a large portion of the movie is spent studying the in depth emotion that is conveyed through Caesar’s face.  This makes much of the beginning of the film a bit of an emotional odyssey.
  2. Emotional to a fault – Speaking of emotional, this film ratchets up the stakes in that regard.  At times I was left feeling a little emotionally raw as at one point it seemed as if the Apes and particularly Caesar were never going to catch a break.  I also believe that walking into this movie believing that I would be watching a chess match showdown between human and ape placed me in the wrong frame of mind for the deeply emotional journey I received.  There are many quiet moments, many deep exchanges, long glances, etc that take the place of actual dialogue, which would work well to establish this journey.  However, for a movie that seemed to tout war being at its core, it would seem that war (while being set against a backdrop of a type of war) was more metaphor than actuality.  It would seem this was more of an emotional war than a physical one.
  3. Bad use of woody harrelson – Woody Harrelson depicts “The Colonel” who is in the film as the primary antagonist to the Apes as well as the key to answering some of the audience’s questions about halfway through the film.  Since the film unfolds as a mystery in the beginning by the time we get a full glimpse of Woody Harrelson he is there to fill all the gaps in the story for us, and to provide an obstacle before the Apes can get to their ultimate goal.  To me, this seemed like it could have been executed more effectively, as Woody Harrelson has the capability and range to have provided more nuance in this role.
  4. No character development for the humans – While all of “The Colonel”‘s backstory is revealed in one monologue, none of the other humans are given this courtesy.  This makes for very one-dimensional villains.  While on some level you may be able to sympathize with “the colonel” given his story, it was very hard for me to understand his followers and why they would engage in such cruelty that didn’t seem to be based on the desperation of survival as they were intending.  The idea that the humans are in a situation where they have no choice but to fight the apes is understandable, however without getting a full idea of the world that the humans themselves live in, it was hard for me to feel anything besides irrational hatred for them.
  5. Ceases world building – Much of this movie (and the series) is spent with the Apes and their view of the world.  This tight view of what is supposed to be a worldwide conflict makes the “planet” advertising to me a bit of a red herring.  Perhaps the idea of an ape “planet” was meant to just be a nod to the original films, however, all of the three movies are entrenched in one particular area of the planet.  This makes the whole idea of a worldwide plague seem a little more far fetched than I believe the creators of the series intended.  If we’re spending all of the time with the Apes and learning about the world only from them and one or two other human encampments, it makes it difficult to zoom out in my mind what survival on this “planet of apes” looks like.

I believe my last point is really why I ultimately didn’t like this movie much to the contrary of most movie goers.  I expected to see a world built out that that shows how the apes went from a forest in CA to across the planet and didn’t quite get that in this film.  This isn’t to say that you shouldn’t go see this movie as I believe it does bring to an emotional conclusion this specific tale of one ape’s view of the world from Rise to War. This makes the film gratifying in that respect I suppose.  However, do not make the mistake of thinking you are going to see apes wage all out war against humans.  Bring your kids, it’s safe for most.  2.99 of 5 stars.

Peg’s Picks – July 12, 2017

me and mom

My mother (fan favorite Peggy Lee) recently retired and has a lot more time on her hands to listen to podcasts, so I’ve decided to curate a list of three specific episodes per week for her a listen to with a brief description to accompany them.  This is specifically made with her in mind, however, feel free to listen through I’m sure there will be interesting content for everyone, especially new listeners of podcasts.  Links are provided below for convenience however, you can also find these shows and episodes anywhere you consume podcasts.

One of my favorite podcasts to listen to is called Radiolab.  Radiolab is a science-based podcast on WNYC network. You could assume that every show they do might be out of the depth of knowledge of the average listener, but they have an outstanding knack for making technical subjects conversational for non-technical people.  They have also done some of the most compelling shows on non-science topics that I’ve ever heard in podcasting. Today, I am going to recommend two episodes from their recent feed:

The first episode is called:

Nukes

Nukes addressing the question many of us have been thinking since January 20th, 2017.  That question being, how exactly does executing a nuclear strike work and are there checks and balances on a Commander in Chief with a questionable temperament.

The second episode recommendation from Radiolab is called:

Radiolab Extra:  Henrietta Lacks

I think a subtitle for this episode can be called “Literal Black girl magic”.  This episode dives deeper into Henriette Lacks unexpected contribution to science and how that affected her descendants as well as the world around you.

My last recommendation comes from a show called Criminal, which is a podcast on the Radiotopia podcast network.  This is a crime centric podcast that covers criminals, crimes, and those who are crime adjacent to include those who enforces and prosecute the laws.The episode is called:

The episode is called:

Episode 69:  Becoming Chief Brown

It covers the rise of a black police chief in Dallas TX and his relationship with his community as well as his job and how that intersected with his blackness.  It’s a very interesting look at policing and blackness when both have been very hot button issues recently.

Feel free to find me on Twitter or Instagram (@ohitsbigron) and let me know what you think of these recommendations, and check out the podcasts on the ohitsbigron studios network here, and here.

 

Spiderman: Homecoming

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The most recent iteration of Spiderman will be the 7th to feature the web-slinging superhero since 2002.  This will be the third reboot of the franchise (not counting the soft backdoor reboot that introduced Spidey to the MCU in Captain America Civil War) as well as the third actor to portray Spiderman in 7 films.  Historically these films have done well in the theaters and are generally appreciated by critics and fans alike with the exception of “Spiderman 3” and “The Amazing Spider-Man 2”, however, 2 bad outings of 7 (ish) films is still pretty good.  Spiderman:  Homecoming doesn’t intend to regurgitate the origin story of Spiderman, however, with a new lead, a new villain, and an entirely new universe to play in, this film will provide a fresh take on the popular superhero.

A few words about Spiderman:  Homecoming:

  1. Great product of Marvel Cinematic Universe – While still considered to be a property of SONY, Marvel Studios had a major role in the production of this film.  The deal they made with SONY allowed the events of Civil War to bleed into this universe and it worked well for the film.  Essentially this is the introduction of a brand new superhero (to the MCU) who, while movie going audiences may be familiar with, has a bit of his own universe to rebuild and in some cases rebrand.  Much like Ant-Man, this film does a good job of telling a smaller story within the Marvel Cinematic Universe while also alluding to larger events on the horizon.  There were moments in this film that felt more realistic because it was seen as a larger part of the MCU. For instance, by adding Robert Downey as a part of the cast, Spiderman immediately feels like a legitimate superhero connected to Iron Man who would have an interest in the villains that Spiderman was dealing with.  This bodes well for the future of the MCU because it means that beyond the Avengers the MCU can hope to expand to rest on the shoulders of all of its potential superheroes.
  2. Perfect lack of exposition – This film makes subtle changes to what we know about Spiderman without spending a ton of time on the details.  Walking into to this film we’re assumed to know, that Peter Parker has been bitten by a radioactive spider, that his uncle is dead, and that he is already for the most part aware of his superhero potential.  This works well because unlike some reboots we’re not expected to spend more time knowing or seeing details that aren’t necessarily important to this specific story.  For the most part, those details didn’t add or take from this story anyway.  Since there is no need to dwell on any of that pesky (albeit necessary) exposition, we’re able to spend more time developing little points like that Peter Parker is extremely intelligent.  We’re able to see him develop his web formula, develop relationships with his high school classmates, and most importantly spend some screen time developing a solid villain.
  3. Great Villian – Some of this will be noted from the first two points but because of the MCU and the lack of exposition, we’re able to spend some time developing a credible properly motivated villain.  The Vulture is born out of the logistical disaster that would be the cleanup after the battle of New York from the first Avengers film.  It was nice to see a villain that was not out of his mind, or some sort of mutant but rather a man while trying to provide for his family becomes a bit misguided using the arsenal of alien equipment which has literally fallen from the sky.  I can’t understate how well the fact that the Vulture, is a salvage contractor plays into the movie.  Later on, in the movie, Michael Keaton’s acting skills are put on display after a bit of a reveal and he and Tom Holland share a very tense moment that could be seen among the highest bits of tension I have seen in a Marvel film.  Great casting, great writing, great execution on this villain.
  4. Perfect tone – It was very enjoyable to see this film commit to allowing Spiderman to be a hapless teenager.  The casting of Tom Holland very much doubles down on this as he does a great job of acting like a young person both in his portrayal of the ambitious superhero and his total lack of full control (and reverence) of his powers.  This, of course, lends itself to many of the normal tropes we’ve seen in countless teen movies, however, this works well for the movie.  Taking a lighthearted tone allows for great juxtaposition when Spiderman is thrust into a serious situation.  It allows us to believe that perhaps he is not quite ready for this responsibility rather than just being capable because he has the powers.  This along with multiple sources of comic relief including from Peter Parker himself allows us as viewers to truly relate to Spiderman maybe even a little more than many of the other Marvel Superheroes.  I think that again, Ant-Man is a good comparison as it leans heavily on the idea of the regular guy thrust into greatness.  This is a good idea for audiences to connect with and it worked well for Spiderman.
  5. Casually diverse – The casting for this film was extremely diverse and done so effortlessly.  Typically before these films are released much ado is made about the casting, mostly with people wondering whether or not the right choices were made.  For this film, I don’t believe I saw one bad choice.  The principal of the high school was Asian, the PE teacher was black, the science teacher was Latina.  There is an interracial family that plays a key role in the plot.  There are multiple black men that play featured roles in the film both villain and antihero, showing complexity in their abilities.  In general, this film is very kind to people of color and allows for race to be a reflection of our current world without straining to do so.  I noticed this because I pay attention to these types of casting choices, however, I think the larger point is that the vast majority of audiences will not care.
  6. Excellent Action Sequences – The action in this film is top notch.  From the actual web swinging and slinging, to the battle sequences between Spiderman and the Vulture, to the cameos from Iron Man, this film packs a punch.  Again, the hapless teenager aspect allows for Peter Parker to underestimate some of his scenarios he swings into, however, this works well in allowing for the action to ebb and flow based on his experience and learning curve.  For audiences that only want to see action, they won’t be disappointed watching this movie.
Overall I think this movie can be filed under “Marvel does it again”.  Upholding the tried and true standard of sticking to emotional truths of characters and story while actually making an engaging and exciting movie.  It was funny, lighthearted, action-packed great movie for summer, but also will be easily consumed multiple times for those audience members requiring a second viewing.  Being that this is the 7th attempt at Spiderman it’s hard to see giving this movie the top score however it’s pretty close.  Bring your kids!  4 of 5 stars.